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Don't Spam, Apply

Don't Spam, Apply

13 Sep 10:00 by Jack Dixon

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Looking for a new job? Don’t spam, apply!

You want a new job and in order to get one, you need to apply to lots and lots of jobs, don’t you? Well, no. Surely if you apply for loads, you’ll enhance your chances of getting the job? Again, no.

The rationale behind this thought process is that job searching is a numbers game. The more you apply for, the more interviews you’ll get and therefore the more likely you are the get a job. That rationale makes absolute sense, but do not take it too far. Here’s why:

It’s a complete waste of your time and money

If you don’t know what position you are applying for, how do you know you want to work in that position for that company? Then you are starting the process for a position which isn’t actually right for you, you might end up getting an interview, which you’ll need to spend time preparing for, have to shell out time and money going to all for what? This could very easily be avoided by spending more time looking at positions before deciding whether to apply.

Setting yourself up for failure

A very common part of the recruitment process is an initial telephone ‘pre-screen’, where a recruiter or hiring manager will ask you about your experience and assess your suitability for a position. Naturally, when interviewing for a position you will be tailoring your experience accordingly, if you have no idea which position you are discussing, you will not be able to show yourself in the best light, again this will hinder you.

You’ll lack credibility

You’ll get a reputation. And not a good one. If you are applying for numerous jobs at a company or to a recruitment company with no apparent regard for what the position consists of, this will depreciate the value in your application and when there is a position which you are genuinely interested in there is a possibility your application will get overlooked due to the rolling eyes of a recruiter/hiring manager. This may be harsh, but it is the reality.

You may need new ear drums

You’ll be getting lots of calls because of the number of applications you have made. If you’re applying with blithe for positions which you’re not actually interested in then you’ll be wearing your ears out for absolutely no reason. Nobody wants that.

If mass applying isn’t the route to take, what should you do?

Figure out what you want

Finding a new job can be time consuming, so be smart and efficient with the time you have.

Take some time to assess what you want from your next job and be targeted in your search. Putting the groundwork at this point in your job search will help you beyond belief.

Get organised

Track your applications. See who you have applied to, if you’ve not heard anything back in a week, send a follow up email or call. Sometimes applications do get lost in the crowd, or missed by human error, maybe the business never actually received your application. This follow up email or call will improve your chances of getting the job, which is the reason you’ve applied in the first place. It also shows initiative and that you are truly interested in the position.

Tailor your CV

Tailoring your CV to the position which you are applying, whether that is in the personal statement, or picking out different previous achievements which are more relevant to the role to which you are applying. Simple, but effective.

Find a good recruiter

Naturally, if you are in a job whilst job search you will be very restricted in the times you can apply for new positions, this is where a good recruiter will come in very useful. Once you know the sector/type of jobs you would like to go for, find which recruitment companies work in that area. Investing time in a good recruiter, who understands the market and takes time to understand your skill set and career aspirations will allow them to bring jobs to you and will save you having to aimlessly flick through Reed (other job-boards are available!) to find your next role. Make the right investment, it will pay its dividends.

Write a cover letter

 Look at the jobs in detail, look how your skill set can add value to that position/business and write a cover letter! The option of writing a cover letter is often optional, if you’re right for a position, state why. This will make your application look much, much more credible and will enhance your chances. If you maybe do not have the direct experience but believe you have the transferrable skills for the position and you want to move in to that sort of a position, then say. Again, this will strengthen your application and improve your chances of getting an interview.

Conclusion

I am not saying follow this advice and you’ll only need to apply for one position, but a few high quality, strong applications are much more likely to land you the position over 19,421 one click applications.